extraordinary   tiles
handmade in France
colours
black & white
brushwork
besso ceramique
This is a selection of tiles from our new black & white range and we’re really rather pleased with them.  The glaze is a little less high-gloss than our colours range but, as you can see on the gallery pages, the two ranges mix happily.   As well as plain tiles there are 15 simple impressed patterns which, together with the variation in opacity from white to almost clear-glazed terracotta, gives an enormous range of possibilities.  You can have simple patterns with predominantly white tiles, or a wild mix of shades and patterns where no two tiles are alike. The full range of patterns is shown below.  Of the 15 impressed tiles, 10 are standard patterns but (should you wish) the last 5 patterns can be varied so that no two are the same (well, almost).   The black tiles use a variation of our LD130 Chamblais glaze and are available in the same 15 patterns, but they don’t vary in opacity - they’re all erm… black.  Actually, being black, they’re also extremely difficult to photograph, but since the impressions do appear more subtle in the flesh than those on white tiles, we have deliberately not tried to ‘bring out’ the pattern too much and so they’re close to what you will actually see.         
Given the way our tiles are produced, we should say that if you're looking for a precise colour match to an existing finish, you're probably in the wrong website.  Hand-dipped glazing with metal oxide colours can be a gloriously imprecise art - one that sets truly handmade tiles apart.
Colour selection is often something that evolves so take your time.  If you don’t have any set ideas and are looking for some inspiration, our galleries are a good place to start.   Below is our colour range.  The left hand examples are the opaque colour whereas the right hand ones demonstrate various degrees of our ‘brushwork’ effect.  Click on the images for a closer look.  Because every tile is made from scratch specifically for you, you can choose any level of brushwork from none to subtle to extreme (or any combination you fancy).  All colours are available in both square and ‘brick’ format.  Scroll down the page for more details of our glazes and to see how we achieve the ‘brushwork’ look.
Tournay (LE40)
Tarais (LE30)
Beaumont (LD085)
Pironnais (LD065)
Landrie (LD110)
Vairie (LD120)
Cadeuc* (LC050)
Betineuc* (LC060)
Villots (LC040)
Saudrais (LC030)
Orieux (LD010)
Linon (LF010)
Léssart (LE010)
Ricollais (LE020)
Lissou (LD050)
Paradis (LD060)
Boissière (LD070)
Marion (LD080)
Grammont (LD090)
Frolou (LD100)
Rivonnais (LD030)
Tréleau (LD040)
Louvière (LC020)
Rufflais (LC010)
Riffier (LA020)
Buffrais (LA010)
Chesnaie (LA040)
Bourrien (LA030)
Ferron (LA060)
Ruza (LA050)
Pommerais (LB030)
Trésoleil (LB020)
Laurier (LB050)
Mottay (LB040)
Chamblais (LD130)
* The LC50-Cadeuc and LC60-Betineuc glazes need a little explanation.  Both glazes are a mix of high gloss blues with a matt coating of (mostly) titanium floating on top.  The extent of the titanium coating varies as the tiles are dipped in the pot of glaze - the earlier ones getting more of the titanium.  We’ve shown 3 versions of each of these tiles, but that is just to demonstrate the range of possibilities - actually, each batch varies gradually between the two extremes.  In short, we can’t really supply significant numbers of either extreme - simply because there are only a few of them in each batch.  If you have a strong desire for one extreme or the other, we will obviously endeavour to provide as many as we can, but there will be practical limits.  We think a mix of them works best anyway - but then I suppose we would say that wouldn’t we.
We make handmade tiles and every single one is unique.  A part of this individuality is due to the distinct brush lines that give glimpses of the terracotta clay beneath the glaze - an effect we call ‘brushwork’.  Whilst we are perfectly adept at producing completely opaque colour, we find that almost everyone looking at our tiles in the flesh gravitates towards those with at least some degree of brushwork. Initially we tended to reserve the stronger brushwork effects for the deeper colours, but we then discovered that in the paler colours, brushwork could really bring texture and interest to a design.  Mixed with neutral shades, a whole new palette emerges which can help accentuate feature tiles or an occasional bold splash of colour.  It’s greater than the sum of it’s parts and quite unlike any tile effect you’ve seen before - the ultimate handmade look.  See the galleries section for some examples of just what can be done with brush-work.
The amount of brushwork visible is entirely dependant on the layer of white liquid clay (slip) beneath the glaze and is not a function of the thickness of the glaze itself - as you can see here the brushwork is deep within the tile.
If you find the sheer number of available permutations a little daunting do not panic - we have a plan - take a look at the black and white gallery for details.
Tisonnais
Berbossou
Messeret
Rochette
Tombelle
Valois
Olivet
Rophemel
Mercier
Fleury
Benoux
Landelle
Corbelin
Cabrac
Joubau
colours
besso ceramique
handmade in France
extraordinary tiles
black & white
brushwork
besso ceramique
Below is our colour range.  The left hand examples are the opaque colour whereas the right hand ones demonstrate various degrees of our ‘brushwork’ effect.  Click on the images for a closer look.  Because every tile is made from scratch specifically for you, you can choose any level of brushwork from none to subtle to extreme (or any combination you fancy).  All colours are available in both square and ‘brick’ format.
Tournay (LE40)
Tarais (LE30)
Beaumont (LD085)
Pironnais (LD065)
Landrie (LD110)
Vairie (LD120)
Cadeuc* (LC050)
Betineuc* (LC060)
Villots (LC040)
Saudrais (LC030)
Orieux (LD010)
Linon (LF010)
Léssart (LE010)
Ricollais (LE020)
Lissou (LD050)
Paradis (LD060)
Boissière (LD070)
Marion (LD080)
Grammont (LD090)
Frolou (LD100)
Rivonnais (LD030)
Tréleau (LD040)
Louvière (LC020)
Rufflais (LC010)
Riffier (LA020)
Buffrais (LA010)
Chesnaie (LA040)
Bourrien (LA030)
Ferron (LA060)
Ruza (LA050)
Pommerais (LB030)
Trésoleil (LB020)
Laurier (LB050)
Mottay (LB040)
Given the way our tiles are produced, we should say that if you're looking for a precise colour match to an existing finish, you're probably in the wrong website.  Hand- dipped glazing with metal oxide colours can be a gloriously imprecise art - one that sets truly handmade tiles apart.
This is a selection of tiles from our new black & white range and we’re really rather pleased with them.  The glaze is a little less high-gloss than our colours range but, as you can see on the gallery pages, the two ranges mix happily.   As well as plain tiles there are 15 simple impressed patterns which, together with the variation in opacity from white to almost clear-glazed terracotta, gives an enormous range of possibilities.  You can have simple patterns with predominantly white tiles, or a wild mix of shades and patterns where no two tiles are alike. The full range of patterns is shown below.  Of the 15 impressed tiles, 10 are standard patterns but (should you wish) the last 5 patterns can be varied so that no two are the same (well, almost).   The black tiles use a variation of our LD130 Chamblais glaze and are available in the same 15 patterns, but they don’t vary in opacity - they’re all erm… black.  Actually, being black, they’re also extremely difficult to photograph, but since the impressions do appear more subtle in the flesh than those on white tiles, we have deliberately not tried to ‘bring out’ the pattern too much and so they’re close to what you will actually see.         
Chamblais (LD130)
* The LC50-Cadeuc and LC60-Betineuc  glazes need a little explanation.  Both glazes are a mix of high gloss blues with a matt coating of (mostly) titanium floating on top.  The extent of the titanium coating varies as the tiles are dipped in the pot of glaze - the earlier ones getting more of the titanium.  We’ve shown 3 versions of each of these tiles, but that is just to demonstrate the range of possibilities - actually, each batch varies gradually between the two extremes.  In short, we can’t really supply significant numbers of either extreme - simply because there are only a few of them in each batch.  If you have a strong desire for one extreme or the other, we will obviously endeavour to provide as many as we can, but there will be practical limits.  We think a mix of them works best anyway - but then I suppose we would say that wouldn’t we.
We make handmade tiles and every single one is unique.  A part of this individuality is due to the distinct brush lines that give glimpses of the terracotta clay beneath the glaze - an effect we call ‘brushwork’.  Whilst we are perfectly adept at producing completely opaque colour, we find that almost everyone looking at our tiles in the flesh gravitates towards those with at least some degree of brushwork. Initially we tended to reserve the stronger brushwork effects for the deeper colours, but we then discovered that in the paler colours, brushwork could really bring texture and interest to a design.  Mixed with neutral shades, a whole new palette emerges which can help accentuate feature tiles or an occasional bold splash of colour.  It’s greater than the sum of it’s parts and quite unlike any tile effect you’ve seen before - the ultimate handmade look.  See the galleries section for some examples of just what can be done with brush- work.
The amount of brushwork visible is entirely dependant on the layer of white liquid clay (slip) beneath the glaze and is not a function of the thickness of the glaze itself - as you can see here the brushwork is deep within the tile.
If you find the sheer number of available permutations a little daunting do not panic - we have a plan - take a look at the black and white gallery for details.
Messeret
Valois
Rophemel
Landelle
Corbelin
Tisonnais
Olivet
Fleury
Benoux
Cabrac
Berbossou
Rochette
Tombelle
Mercier
Joubau