extraordinary   tiles
handmade in France
designs
besso ceramique
random patterns
geometric patterns
OK, so there’s a bit of a cheat needed at the end to avoid the 2 mint greens being next to each other and it might all seem a bit fiddly, but even if you get some bits wrong, you’re only likely to make it more random.  By the way, if anyone can come up with a version of this that doesn’t need that one ‘cheat’ somewhere, we’d be delighted to hear about it - it’s just so frustrating.
If you’re going down the brushwork route, things get even easier as tiles of the same colour can look very different and, with most patterns, a run of just 6 tiles like this can be repeated without a pattern emerging.  Scroll down to the geometric patterns below and you’ll see even a 2-colour chequerboard starts to look random with brushwork tiles.
2 colours
3 colours
5 colours
4 colours
Once you have some colours in mind, you can look into how you want to arrange them.   Essentially it’s a choice  between mixing your colours randomly or in some form of geometric pattern, but the line between the two can be blurred - particularly if you go with brushwork tiles. However you intend to layout your tiles though, we can help.  We have our complete colour palette available in the form of miniature tile photos, each with half-width grout gaps super-imposed around them.  If the images are butted up to each other, it gives a good impression of grouted tiles and is the perfect tool to help you test out your ideas - or tweak ours.  We use these images extensively around the site and we now have multiple images of each colour, including brushwork versions, in both square and brick format.  You can download the full colour palettes or one of our themed palettes - complete with example layouts to get those creative juices flowing!  Of course, if you’re not the technically inclined type, there’s always the option of asking us to do it for you - we simply email the layouts - but we find most people prefer the speed and freedom of doing it for themselves.    Scroll right down the page for details on what you need to do.  
If you click on the images to enlarge them you will see it’s not a perfect match - and it never can be, but we certainly can’t think of anything better
They can be simple and clearly geometric or they can be really rather subtle.  Their big advantage is that they make it very easy to calculate exactly how many of each colour you need and if you want to mix four or less colours, this is generally the way to go.   At the moment, we’re struggling a bit to come up with geometric offset patterns for the ‘brick’ tiles (well, ones we like anyway - all help gratefully received!) , so below are some designs for standard square patterns in opaque and brushwork styles.
The first thing to note is that a truly random pattern is not necessarily going to look random.  What we like to think of as random generally has no discernable pattern or grouping of the same colour - many don’t even like to see two tiles of the same colour next to each other.  In reality, it’s anything but random. To achieve the perfect random ‘look’ it is necessary to lay out the entire pattern prior to installation and swap colours in and out where a pattern might have emerged or simply to get the look just right.  This is a time-consuming process and also involves ordering extra tiles to leave some room for adjustment.   Fortunately there are alternatives. Look at this run of 24 tiles.  The break in the shadow of the  window bar is a bit of a giveaway, but it’s not easy to tell from the pattern alone that it’s just two copies of the same picture side by side.   Yes, a simple solution to the problem is just to design a random pattern 12 tiles long, and use it again and again - a bit of care at the ends and nobody is going to see that your ‘pattern’ repeats every twelve tiles.  This approach is also an easy way to ensure the predominant mix of colours stays the same.
Another simple ‘cheat’ is to use the same colours in rotating blocks.  The example below uses 6 colours (obviously, it can be any 6 colours) and has a pair of each in every block of 12 tiles.  Each block of 12 tiles simply moves the pairs around within the block until you get back where you started.  If you look carefully, every block of 12 has an identical pattern, but because the colours move around, the eye doesn’t pick it up and it looks random.  Ordering for this pattern could hardly be simpler.
To make the process even easier, you can make use of our ready-made ‘random designs’.  Available right here…
image file downloads
This section allows you to download the image files mentioned earlier.  With these you can produce your own layout from scratch or simply tweak one of the examples we provide.  You can download the whole colour palette and/or sub-palettes (the latter come with example designs). You can use the image files with a variety of software on PC, MAC and almost all mobile devices.  Having said that, whilst phones and tablets are fine for trying out colours together, for layouts we think you really can't beat a bigger screen. The files are in Powerpoint .pptx format and are compatible with: Microsoft Office Powerpoint - Win, Mac OS X Google Slides - On-line desktop or mobile. Apple Keynote - Mac OS X, iOS LibreOffice Impress - Win, Mac OS X, Linux OpenOffice Impress - Win, Mac OS X, Linux Using the pptx file format is a compromise.  It is the most compatible from a software point of view, but the downside is the file sizes can be very large (more than 10 times the size of other formats).  Because of this, we provide both high and low resolution versions. Most of the above software applications will, by default, line up the tiles if they're placed close enough to each other (known as 'snapping'), but if your software doesn't do this by itself you may need a tweak to the 'options'.  In general you will want to activate a 'snap to objects' option and disable any 'snap to grid' or 'snap to guides' options.  Then it’s just a case of copying and pasting tiles or groups of tiles until it’s time for bed.
This is the whole colour palette in both square and brick formats, opaque and brushwork, together with the black & white tiles and a selection of coloured borders to mix in with them.  This is a blank canvas (no examples).
This is the square tile sub-palette with opaque and brushwork versions.  You can start from scratch or work from one of the numerous starter designs and swap colours in or out as you please. 
This is the brick tile sub- palette with opaque and brushwork versions.  Again, you can start from scratch or work from one of the starter designs and swap colours in or out as you please. 
And finally, the black & white tile sub-palette.  As before, delete what you don’t want, then swap and tweak to your heart’s content.
High-Res (13MB)
Low-Res (2MB)
High-Res (86MB)
Low-Res (3MB)
High-Res (69MB)
Low-Res (2MB)
High-Res (49MB)
Low-Res (1MB)
everything
square tiles
brick tiles
black & white tiles
ready-made random designs page designs page ready-made random Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now
designs
besso ceramique
handmade in France
extraordinary tiles
besso ceramique
random patterns
geometric patterns
OK, so there’s a bit of a cheat needed at the end to avoid the 2 mint greens being next to each other and it might all seem a bit fiddly, but even if you get some bits wrong, you’re only likely to make it more random.  By the way, if anyone can come up with a version of this that doesn’t need that one ‘cheat’ somewhere, we’d be delighted to hear about it - it’s just so frustrating.
If you’re going down the brushwork route, things get even easier as tiles of the same colour can look very different and, with most patterns, a run of just 6 tiles like this can be repeated without a pattern emerging.  Scroll down to the geometric patterns below and you’ll see even a 2-colour chequerboard starts to look random with brushwork tiles.
2 colours
3 colours
5 colours
4 colours
They can be simple and clearly geometric or they can be really rather subtle.  Their big advantage is that they make it very easy to calculate exactly how many of each colour you need and if you want to mix four or less colours, this is generally the way to go.   At the moment, we’re struggling a bit to come up with geometric offset patterns for the ‘brick’ tiles (well, ones we like anyway - all help gratefully received!) , so below are some designs for standard square patterns in opaque and brushwork styles.
The first thing to note is that a truly random pattern is not necessarily going to look random.  What we like to think of as random generally has no discernable pattern or grouping of the same colour - many don’t even like to see two tiles of the same colour next to each other.  In reality, it’s anything but random. To achieve the perfect random ‘look’ it is necessary to lay out the entire pattern prior to installation and swap colours in and out where a pattern might have emerged or simply to get the look just right.  This is a time-consuming process and also involves ordering extra tiles to leave some room for adjustment.   Fortunately there are alternatives. Look at this run of 24 tiles.  The break in the shadow of the  window bar is a bit of a giveaway, but it’s not easy to tell from the pattern alone that it’s just two copies of the same picture side by side.   Yes, a simple solution to the problem is just to design a random pattern 12 tiles long, and use it again and again - a bit of care at the ends and nobody is going to see that your ‘pattern’ repeats every twelve tiles.  This approach is also an easy way to ensure the predominant mix of colours stays the same.
Another simple ‘cheat’ is to use the same colours in rotating blocks.  The example below uses 6 colours (obviously, it can be any 6 colours) and has a pair of each in every block of 12 tiles.  Each block of 12 tiles simply moves the pairs around within the block until you get back where you started.  If you look carefully, every block of 12 has an identical pattern, but because the colours move around, the eye doesn’t pick it up and it looks random.  Ordering for this pattern could hardly be simpler.
Once you have some colours in mind, you can look into how you want to arrange them.   Essentially it’s a choice  between mixing your colours randomly or in some form of geometric pattern, but the line between the two can be blurred - particularly if you go with brushwork tiles. However you intend to layout your tiles though, we can help.  We have our complete colour palette available in the form of miniature tile photos, each with half-width grout gaps super- imposed around them.  If the images are butted up to each other, it gives a good impression of grouted tiles and is the perfect tool to help you test out your ideas - or tweak ours.  We use these images extensively around the site and we now have multiple images of each colour, including brushwork versions, in both square and brick format.  You can download the full colour palettes or one of our themed palettes - complete with example layouts to get those creative juices flowing!  Of course, if you’re not the technically inclined type, there’s always the option of asking us to do it for you - we simply email the layouts - but we find most people prefer the speed and freedom of doing it for themselves.    Scroll right down the page for details on what you need to do.  
If you click on the images to enlarge them you will see it’s not a perfect match - and it never can be, but we certainly can’t think of anything better
To make the process even easier, you can make use of our ready-made ‘random designs’.  Available right here…
image file downloads
This section allows you to download the image files mentioned earlier.  With these you can produce your own layout from scratch or simply tweak one of the examples we provide.  You can download the whole colour palette and/or sub-palettes (the latter come with example designs). You can use the image files with a variety of software on PC, MAC and almost all mobile devices.  Having said that, whilst phones and tablets are fine for trying out colours together, for layouts we think you really can't beat a bigger screen. The files are in Powerpoint .pptx format and are compatible with: Microsoft Office Powerpoint - Win, Mac OS X Google Slides - On-line desktop or mobile. Apple Keynote - Mac OS X, iOS LibreOffice Impress - Win, Mac OS X, Linux OpenOffice Impress - Win, Mac OS X, Linux Using the pptx file format is a compromise.  It is the most compatible from a software point of view, but the downside is the file sizes can be very large (more than 10 times the size of other formats).  Because of this, we provide both high and low resolution versions. Most of the above software applications will, by default, line up the tiles if they're placed close enough to each other (known as 'snapping'), but if your software doesn't do this by itself you may need a tweak to the 'options'.  In general you will want to activate a 'snap to objects' option and disable any 'snap to grid' or 'snap to guides' options.  Then it’s just a case of copying and pasting tiles or groups of tiles until it’s time for bed.
This is the whole colour palette in both square and brick formats, opaque and brushwork, together with the black & white tiles and a selection of coloured borders to mix in with them.  This is a blank canvas (no examples).
everything
High-Res (13MB)
Low-Res (2MB)
This is the square tile sub-palette with opaque and brushwork versions.  You can start from scratch or work from one of the numerous starter designs and swap colours in or out as you please. 
square tiles
High-Res (86MB)
Low-Res (3MB)
This is the brick tile sub-palette with opaque and brushwork versions.  Again, you can start from scratch or work from one of the starter designs and swap colours in or out as you please. 
High-Res (69MB)
Low-Res (2MB)
brick tiles
And finally, the black & white tile sub-palette.  As before, delete what you don’t want, then swap and tweak to your heart’s content.
High-Res (49MB)
Low-Res (1MB)
black & white tiles
ready-made random designs page designs page ready-made random Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now Download Now